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WELLNESS CENTER
Fitness
You may wonder what all the fuss is about exercise. Simply put, inactivity is hazardous to your health. Physical activity can help you prevent chronic disease, manage your weight, and stay mentally fit. The best news is that it's never too late to adopt a more active lifestyle.
Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive condition, but it can be managed. With help from your family, your friends and your health care team, you can learn to take care of yourself and stay healthy.
Men's Health
Stay healthy and vigorous into old age by eating right, getting plenty of exercise and following recommended disease prevention practices.
    INTERACTIVE TOOLS

    The last time you visited your doctor for an illness, he or she might have ordered a CBC test to help determine the diagnosis. CBC stands for complete blood count, but what does that mean? And what do all those numbers on the result sheet mean? Find out by taking this quiz.

    Drinking can be an expensive habit. While you may not notice a dollar here or two dollars there, consider how much you spend per week and per year on alcohol.

    Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks for colorectal cancer.

      MULTIMEDIA

      Having shoulder pain or problems lifting your arms over your head? You may have tendonitis or a tear in the muscles and tendons that hold your shoulder in place, called the rotator cuff. This video explains symptoms of this syndrome, possible treatments, and ways you can prevent shoulder injuries.

      As your body's largest organ, your skin is a master multitasker. It keeps fluids in, preventing dehydration. It regulates body temperature. It senses external stimuli, such as pain. It produces vitamin D from sunlight.

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